Waist pouch solves lost key problems

Last year around this time I went jogging. My jogging pants had no pockets and my hoodie had open pockets. I just carry a single key and put it in my hoodie pocket. I would remember to check on it every time I moved my jacket around. I finally warmed up enough to take my jacket off and reached in my pocket to make sure the key wouldn’t fall out. Too late! It had already fallen out. I turned around and retraced my steps – 3 times! No key.

I posted on the blogs and kept searching lost and found sites. It never turned up. I grudgingly coughed up the $175 to replace the key and vowed to never let it happen again. This meant some pretty awkward arrangements like always wearing a coat with zippers (even when it was 90).
At last I looked at my remnants and discovered a fun piece of striped material which I have turned into a waist pouch. It is lightweight and not awkward like those big fanny packs I used to wear that held everything. I can put my single key in it and my phone. Which is nice because I was tired of carrying that in my hand.

I love my new pouch. Maybe I’ll take the $175 I’ll never have to spend again and get a new jogging outfit and shoes to go with it.

Lightweight waist pouch ready to go

How do you solve your awkward carrying problems?

Post Turkey Ride

On Thanksgiving we had a marvelous turkey feast at my sister in laws house. She lives in the small town of Shine on the far end of the Hood Canal Bridge.  I suggested we spend the weekend on the peninsula. The weather was marginal but miraculously we did not get rained on until we went to the rain forest!

On Friday we tried out the new section of the Olympic Discovery Trail. This portion went from a trailhead at Diamond Point Road and we rode it into the QFC in Sequim. This section was mostly trail with a couple miles on very quiet roads and a small portion on the shoulder of the 101 off ramp in Sequim. It was a delight to ride through farmland and thick forest with views of the Olympic Mountains to the south and Discovery Bay to the north.

As soon as we pulled into the lot an older dog came and sat looking at me through the window. Soon his owner followed and we learned his personal history of the area. It was a delightful conversation and the perfect introduction to the trail. Before we had even gotten on our bikes another car pulled up and began a conversation. This young man had just moved to the area and after watching the months of construction he was delighted the trail had opened. People and dogs were more open than in the city. The trail itself was fairly busy for a potentially  rainy November day in a quiet part of the state. By busy I mean we saw about 20 people riding and  a dozen or more walkers.

On this stretch you also ride past a native art gallery and a casino with a few dining options as well as a lavender farm and a state park or two. There is a long bridge over what used to be a rail trestle. It had some interesting historical information about the old train.

It felt good to get out into the country and away from traffic for this week’s ride. I also tested my new tool roll under seat bike bag made from my far out paisley upholstery remnant. It passed with flying colors.