In October we toured southern music towns. In Louisville we attended Bourbon and Beyond. The artists all had a distinctive image which matched their music style. Lenny Kravitz was cool rocker dude superstar, Sheryl Crow sexy older woman who didn’t have to try hard to look sexy, Joseph was delicate ethereal, David Byrne was studied suited and barefoot, John Maier was relaxed in a robe. These folks are superstars. They can wear what they want. What came first? Did their style evolve as a result of their music or did their music and style evolve together to create an image without dissonance?

As a side note I was looking forward to seeing what styles the audience brought to the show but the deluge of rain was the semi- great equalizer. There were still distinct styles.

  • The hiker rain gear and hiking boots (that was mine) of gore tex and breathable rain gear. This did not make the functionality cut. In a torrential downpour that went on for hours I was soaked.
  • The did not prepare at all for this type of weather group wearing normal concert clothing and flip flops and sandals or tennis shoes under see through ponchos purchased at the show.
  • The well prepared wearing the type of heavy rubber rain gear and knee high rubber boots you would wear out in a fishing boat.

By the end of the night it didn’t matter. We were all clay mud soaked to the ankle and beyond depending on whether or not you had fallen into the mud pit that used to be a grassy park.

What you wear can project your brand. If your brand is unclear it may be a result of you being unclear about your personal path or identity. And that is OK. We change over time and we lose our way at times as we go through these changes. It takes time to adjust mentally and the style we project to the world doesn’t catch up that fast unless you take the time to work on it.

How about you? Does your outer image project what is on the inside? I am happy to help you evaluate your image and help you reach the image you want to project.