Appearance and Income

Appearance and Income

Studies show links between personal appearance, employment and income that I find fascinating. Google personal appearance and income and you will find some interesting articles.

Malcolm Gladwell did a survey on the height of Fortune 500 CEO’s and found that the average CEO is about 3 inches taller than the average American man. (And you note that he was studying men).

This article discusses results of some of those studies and ponders what that means.

This study from 2006  https://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/3043406  came up with three transmission channels for the beauty premium.

  1. Physically attractive workers are more confident and higher confidence increases wages.
  2. For a given level of confidence physically attractive workers are (wrongly) considered more able by employers.
  3. Controlling for worker confidence, physically attractive workers have oral skills (such as communication and social skills) that raise their wages when they interact with employers.

Don’t be discouraged or blame our looks for our luck in life. There are tricks you can use to create appearances that match society’s ideal even if you are more towards the average (which is all of us) appearance. You can dress to appear taller and more slender. You can wear clothes that fit. You can learn to create confidence from the inside out that will make anything you wear look better.

The mind perceives (even our own) before logical thinking takes over. Test yourself throughout the day today and observe those background thoughts that you don’t usually notice about the people you meet, see on TV or in the media.

Were you surprised?

As much as you may wish to fight this and stay the way you are if you have dreams and goals, being able to confidently make a good impression visually, with your actions and with your words (including voice) is so important.

Who do you want to be? How much do you want to make? I encourage you to dress as if you are already there.

Sew Chic Patterns 1940’s collection

Sew Chic Patterns 1940’s collection

Since last week you may have visited Sewchicpatterns.com and discovered your own favorite vintage style patterns. This week I am  taking a look at their 1940’s collection and seeing which patterns will flatter a triangle shape (which is my body type). The first one up is the Fifth Ave dress. Gloriously beautiful and my favorite. It could work for me if I don’t have all that excess fabric bunched up at the hip and just sew the seam flat. Which I hope would be a minor pattern alteration.  The asymmetrical  Pendleton dress is perfect and looks less complicated to sew (although it is still rated for advanced sewers). What works is that great collar, the design line that quickly leads the eye up and down the body and the little flare at the hemline. The vignette skirt is only a maybe. As pictured with that portrait blouse it might work. The pockets at the hip and the tapering to the knees only serve to emphasize the hips.

Which of these beautiful garments would you add to your wardrobe?

Sew Chic Pattern Co.

Sew Chic Pattern Co.

 

My local Seattle fabric store – Pacific Fabrics (the one that sells great garment fabric) recently sent out a notice about a Sew Chic trunk show. If you are interested it is at their Northgate location from 10 to noon on September 1.

I loved vintage clothes when I was younger and would find them at thrift stores and by raiding my mom’s closet. I found as I aged they didn’t look as fabulous and made me look vintage. As an experiment I browsed the collection to see what would work with my triangle body shape. The website sewchicpatterns.com is broken down into 1930’s, 1940’s and 1950’s style patterns along with several other categories.

Today let’s look at the 1930’s collection. The Myrtlewood dress is my favorite. That belt at the hip line would not work for me so alas I must move on to the other choices. The Fantasia dress moves the sash up above the waist and would be a perfect choice for a triangle. The Constance dress, Ehlen and Portrait blouses are three more fabulous choices because the details are above the hips. These beautiful styles would be perfect for a triangle.

Next week I will tackle the 1940’s collection  to see which of these great patterns I could use. Which of these 30’s patters do you like the best?

 

Muffin top is a choice

Muffin top is a choice

It is tempting to try to wear things that fit last fall after an active summer and before the holiday eating bonus that happens from Halloween through New Year’s. But unless you are more disciplined than me that will result in muffin top!
I used to say that it was great to be over 50 because muffin tops are expected! However expected they may be, they are avoidable.
This morning I put on my tightest pair of jeans just to make sure I could still get them zipped. Yes they zipped but……….. look at that fabulous bulge. (I believe the last time we embraced that was when we were 2). If I choose to wear these jeans and this outfit today I will be too self-conscious to take the jacket off if I get warm. Not a great outfit choice even if it looks good. After looking at my photos it is obvious the short sleeved t shirt – in addition to being too thin of a fabric – is too small. Guess what I need to add to my make it/buy it list – longer short sleeve tops in my basic colors made of thicker fabric in a larger size.

The immediate solutions to this problem would be:

  • Wear a larger size jean so the bulge disappears
  • Put on a heavier knit top that is not quite so form fitting. (this is the one I chose)
  • Or you embrace it as you did when you were 2 as a beautiful part of your body!

As you can see in the pictures as I tried these solutions it looks like I and my muffin top shrank.

How do you reconcile changing body size in your wardrobe?

Too tight clothes result in muffint op
Do I want the world to see this?